Project 7: Aliens on the Lough

This project will raise awareness and provide advice and training to the local community on identification and management of invasive species including Japanese Knotweed, Himalayan Balsam and Giant Hogweed in the Lough Erne area.

Project 7: Aliens on the Lough

Invasive species are plant and wildlife species which are not native to the region that they are found.  Species can become evident in areas for several reason but with some invasive species if they are not managed, they can be detrimental to local habitats and native species.

Through this project LELP in partnership with Fermanagh and Omagh District Council and local volunteers will work toward the eradication of areas of invasive species within the LELP area.

To access the IAS Species ID cards click here

For more information contact Heather Gott call: 07738 116385 email: heather.gott@rspb.org.uk

Related Videos

Sarah Jane Explaining the Invasive Species we are working to manage

Project Updates

Free training on Identification and control of invasive species – September 2021

COMPLETED

Do you know what an invasive species is?

Would you like to be able to identify and control them?

Interested in training?

FODC and LELP are offering free training on Identification and control of invasive species, to landowners, community groups, farmers and any other organization bodies who would like to learn more about identifying and controlling IAS on their land

There are two courses to choose from: –

Identification of Invasive and Injurious Species – this is a Level 2 Award accredited course which consists of 1-day Classroom and practical demonstration and it covers a range of subjects i.e.

  • Legislation on Invasive Species
  • The Identification of Invasive Species
  • Actions to be taken when Species are Identified
  • The requirement for keeping records.

Location is likely to be Castle Archdale Country Park, Co. Fermanagh on 8th and 14th October 9.30am – 4.00pm.  Refreshments will be provided.

Control of Invasive Species level 2 – this is a 1-day remote online course which is non assessed but is Lantra accredited. By the end of the course, you will be able to:

  • Identify 7 of some of the most invasive plant species in the UK.
  • Be aware of the ecological & environmental impacts of the invasive species
  • Be aware of the basic methods of control
  • Be aware of the methods of appropriate disposal of cut vegetation

This course will be online and dates likely to be the end of September – dates to be confirmed.

Places are limited therefore bookings are first come, first served.  We hope to deliver several training sessions, subject to demand.

Please email your preference for which course you wish to attend to biodiversity@fermanaghomagh.com by 13th September 2021.

This training is part of the ‘Aliens on the Lough’ project to raise awareness and increase action for IAS locally.  This project which is supported by the Lough Erne Landscape Partnership through funding from the National Lottery Heritage Fund, is one of 23 projects that will be facilitated by the Lough Erne Landscape Partnership programme to promote, protect and enhance the natural, built and cultural heritage of the Lough Erne region.

Invasive Species Week – May 2021

This week keep an eye out for Invasive Alien Species (IAS) in your area and record sightings at www2.habitas.org.uk/records/ISI. View for downloadable guides below  to help you identify invasive species that may occur in your local patch. Recording this data is vital to help limit or stop the spread altogether. Species such as the Asian Hornet or the Oak Processionary Moth have been recorded in parts of England but not yet in Northern Ireland, so vigilance is essential.

Invasive species are species that have been introduced (deliberately or accidentally) by humans and have a negative impact on the economy, wildlife or habitats of Ireland and Northern Ireland. After habitat loss, invasive species are the second biggest threat to biodiversity worldwide, and the biggest threat on islands.

Human activities are the main cause of the arrival of invasive species. Many species are deliberately released whilst others have escaped from our gardens and farms like the American mink and giant rhubarb. Some arrive as hitch hikers and stowaways with imported goods like the New Zealand flatworm!

For further species information and identification visit www.invasivespeciesireland.com or www.nonnativespecies.org.

If you suspect you have seen one of these, or any other Invasive Alien Species, submit the details at www2.habitas.org.uk/records/ISI

Invasive Species Training – Rhododendron Control and Eradication – March 2020

On the 20th of March 2020 Fermanagh and Omagh District Council in partnership with Lough Erne Landscape Partnership will be hosting our first Rhododendron Bash in Castle Archdale Country Park

Invasive Species Identification Resources – December 2019

What is an Invasive Alien Species

Invasive species are species that have been introduced (deliberately or accidentally) by humans and have a negative impact on the economy, wildlife or habitats of Ireland and Northern Ireland. After habitat loss, invasive species are the second biggest threat to biodiversity worldwide, and the biggest threat on islands.

Keep an eye out for Invasive Alien Species (IAS) in your area and record sightings with the Centre for Environmental Data and Recording.  View our downloadable guides below to help you identify invasive species that may occur in your local patch.  Recording this data is vital to help limit the amount or stop the spread completely.  Species such as the Asian Hornet or the Oak Processionary Moth have been recorded in parts of England and just recently in the island of Ireland, so vigilance is essential.

Human activities are the main cause of the arrival of invasive species.  Many species are deliberately released whilst others have escaped from our gardens and farms like the American mink and giant rhubarb.  Some arrive as hitchhikers and stowaways with imported goods like the New Zealand flatworm!

For further species information and identification visit Invasive Species Ireland or Non Native Species Secretariat.

To access the IAS Species ID cards click here

Request for Quotation for Japanese Knotweed Control – September 2019

Request for Quotation for Japanese Knotweed Control – CLOSED

Closing Date:  12 noon, Wednesday 11th September 2019

As part of the Invasive Species project Fermanagh and Omagh District Council invite quotations for a Japanese Knotweed Control Programme across 7 sites in the Enniskillen area for the Autumn 2019 treatment.  The awarded contractor will treat all Japanese Knotweed stands found at various sites, full information on the sites can be found in the information pack.  For further information regarding this quotation request and a full information pack please contact  Julie Corry,Julie.corry@fermanaghomagh.com

The works must be complete by the end of the season, before 31st October 2019.

As part of the Invasive Species project Fermanagh and Omagh District Council invite quotations for a Japanese Knotweed Control Programme across 7 sites in the Enniskillen area for the Autumn 2019 treatment.  The awarded contractor will treat all Japanese Knotweed stands found at various sites, full information on the sites can be found in the information pack.  For further information regarding this quotation request and a full information pack please contact  Julie Corry,Julie.corry@fermanaghomagh.com

The works must be complete by the end of the season, before 31st October 2019.

Aliens on the Lough – An introduction to Invasive Species – March 2019

Fermanagh and Omagh District Council were pleased to host the first “Aliens on the Lough” training event at Castle Archdale Country Park as part of the Lough Erne Landscape Partnership (LELP) programme designed to promote awareness of invasive alien species locally.  An invasive alien species or IAS is categorised as any non-native animal or plant which can spread and cause damage to local biodiversity, the economy and health

Pictured above is Japanese Knotweed, also known as monkeyweed, elephant ears or donkey rhubarb.  Participants at the workshop were advised against cutting invasive alien species like this which is an offence under the Wildlife (NI) Order and can spread the plant.

Launch of Aliens on the Lough Project – March 2019

Launch of Aliens on the Lough – an Introduction to Invasive Alien Species

Fermanagh and Omagh District Council were pleased to host the first “Aliens on the Lough” training event at Castle Archdale Country Park as part of the Lough Erne Landscape Partnership (LELP) programme designed to promote awareness of invasive alien species locally. An invasive alien species or IAS is categorised as any non-native animal or plant which can spread and cause damage to local biodiversity, the economy and health.

This training event saw the launch of the “Aliens on the Lough” project, which is supported by the Lough Erne Landscape Partnership through funding from the National Lottery Heritage Fund. The programme will facilitate the delivery of a suite of 23 projects with the aim to promote, protect and enhance the natural, built and cultural heritage of the Lough Erne region.

LELP Programme Manager Elmarie Swanepoel stated:

“We are delighted to be working in partnership with Fermanagh and Omagh District Council on this project. We recognise the importance of protecting the natural biodiversity of the region and ensuring that we work with our partners to enhance the unique landscape that the Lough Erne region has to offer. This project is vital in raising awareness of the issue of non native invasive species and the impact that they are having on the local landscape. “

Fermanagh and Omagh District Council are dedicated to tackling the issue of IAS as part of the Fermanagh and Omagh Local Biodiversity Action Plan and Community Plan 2020. To successfully meet its aims and objectives, it is important to have the support and involvement of local people and organisations, so organisers were pleased with the turnout at Friday’s event.

The session opened with a short presentation which highlighted several IAS, of which there are over 2,000 throughout the UK. The main species which the project will focus on locally are Japanese Knotweed, Himalayan Balsam, Giant Hogweed and Rhododendron.

The presentation highlighted some methods that are used to eliminate certain species, illustrating how some can even take years to manage. With the aid of volunteers, the project will help to manage affected areas in the Lough Erne area. This session closed with a site visit in Castle Archdale to see many of the IAS covered including rhododendron, laurel, American raspberry.

Anyone who is interested in learning more about the identification and management of IAS should keep an eye out for future training sessions on our website or contact the Julie Corry to register your interest in attending one. Courses can be tailored to suit the needs of a community group within the Lough Erne Landscape Partnership area.

If you see what you believe to be any of the aforementioned invasive alien species please do cut or disturb it, but do report it on https://www2.habitas.org.uk/records/ISI.

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